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Movie Review : Detective Byomkesh Bakshi!


Title : Detective Byomkesh Bakshi!
Language : Hindi
Year : 2015
Director : Dibankar Banerjee
Genre : Mystery, Thriller
IMDB Link
Watch trailer on Youtube
Lead Role : Sushant Singh Rajput, Neeraj Kabi, Divya Menon, Anand Tiwary, Swastika Mukherjee

Byomkesh Bakshi is a fictional character penned by Sharadindu Bandyopadhyay, and one could say he is India’s answer to the famous hat detective, Sherlock Holmes. Several directors have tried their hand in portraying this Kolkata based private investigator onscreen. The latest adaptation is by noted director Dibankar Banerjee, who has come up with a commendable piece of work.

Everything begins when Ajit Banerjee visits Byomkesh to seek his advice in the case of his missing father. The eccentric protagonist takes up the case, and he decides to stay at a lodge where Mr. Banerjee stayed before vanishing. He interacts with each distinctive inmates of the lodging, and from there it’s a maze of clues and deductions.
The movie maintains a dark mood throughout, and the Calcutta of 1940s has been well captured. Another point of interest is that despite the presence of police, army, drug dealers and the sort, guns are rarely used in the movie. The antagonist (would not say who as it spoils the fun) is given equal space as the hero is. And judging by the way it ended, there is every possibility for a sequel.

It is refreshing to see that Byomkesh Bakshi does not ape Sherlock Holmes. Sushant Singh Rajput has played his justified his casting. His name may not top the list of popular actors, but the young good looking man is here to stay.






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